Kimchi is a staple in Korean diets. In fact, Koreans eat approximately 40 pounds of it per person each year!  The reddish fermented cabbage dish is served at every meal, either alone or mixed with rice or noodles. It’s high-fiber content and low-fat qualities help keep the people of Korea slim.

Republic of Korea / Flickr

Kimchi is loaded with vitamins A, B, and C. Kimchi is also a fermented food, containing the healthy bacteris lactobacilli, which is also found in yogurt. Fermented foods help with digestion, and can even prevent yeast infections, according to a recent study.

The napa cabbage in kimchi is part of the Brassica family (which includes broccoli, brussel sprouts, and kale). Napa is packed with many antioxidant plant compounds such as carotenes, thiocyanates, indole-3-carbinol, lutein, zea-xanthin, sulforaphane and isothiocyanates.

The napa cabbage and daikon radish makes kimchi a rich source source of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber. Scientific studies suggest these compounds are known to offer protection against breast, colon and prostate cancers and help reduce LDL or “bad cholesterol” levels in the blood.

So what are you waiting for? With all these amazing health benefits, you’d be crazy not to start making your own kimchi today! Try this easy recipe and let us know what you think in the comments below!

Homemade Kimchi
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The amazing benefits of kimchi can easily be harnessed at home with this super simple recipe!
Servings
8
Servings
8
Homemade Kimchi
BigOven - Save recipe or add to grocery list
Yum
Print Recipe
The amazing benefits of kimchi can easily be harnessed at home with this super simple recipe!
Servings
8
Servings
8
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters and remove the cores. Cut each quarter crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips.
  2. Place the cabbage and salt in a large bowl. Wearing gloves, use your hands to massage the salt into the cabbage until it starts to get soft. Add water to cover the cabbage. Put a plate on top and weigh it down with something heavy. Let the mixture stand for 1 to 2 hours.
  3. Rinse the cabbage under cold water 3 times and drain in a colander for 15 to 20 minutes. Rinse and dry the bowl and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, combine the garlic, ginger, sugar, and 2 tablespoons of fish sauce (or 3 tbsp of water) in a small bowl and mix to form a smooth paste. Mix in the Korean style red pepper flakes.
  5. Gently squeeze any remaining water from the cabbage and return it to the bowl along with the radish, carrot shavings, scallions, and seasoning paste.
  6. Using your gloved hands, gently massage and work the paste into the vegetables until they are thoroughly coated.
  7. Pack the kimchi into the jar, pressing down on it until the brine rises to cover the vegetables. Leave at least 1 inch of space between the kimchi and the lid of the jar. Close the jar with the lid.
  8. Place the jar inside a bowl in case any brine seeps out of the lid and let the kimchi sit at room temperature for 1 to 5 days. I like to keep it in my pantry so it's out of the way.
  9. Check the kimchi once a day, pressing down on the vegetables with a clean finger or spoon to keep it submerged under the brine. When the kimchi tastes ripe enough for your liking, transfer the jar to the refrigerator. You can eat it right away, but it tastes best after another week or two.
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Angelique Johnson
Owner at Nutrition by Angelique
Angelique Johnson, BS, NDTR is a Miami-based nutritionist who is excited to help others live healthier lives through good nutrition. She loves fitness, writing, blogging, cooking, and eating delicious foods.

A self-proclaimed chocolate-fanatic, she prides herself in being able to show others that there are no "bad foods," only "bad habits."

She received her Bachelors of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics and is currently a Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics candidate. Her plans include starting her PhD in the summer of 2016. She currently lives in Miami with her husband and French bulldog, Mingus.


Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only. The author, Angelique Johnson, and the associated www.nutritionbyangelique.net are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician. Angelique Johnson and www.nutritionbyangelique.net claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.